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What do Carbine use to animate? What should i learn?

Discussion in 'WildStar Fan Creations' started by Sanja Melody, Jun 7, 2013.

  1. Sanja Melody

    Sanja Melody Cupcake

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    Hello everyone. I'm currently looking into 3D animating. I haven't started studying yet because i wanna choose a program to familiarize myself with.

    And i thought, Since carbine is currently the 'future' in MMO's i wondered what program you guys would suggest i learned? I currently are unable to draw anything though, and i hoped i could skip that part and only be an animator. So someone draws the figure for me and i animate it for them. Would that work?

    I'm very new in that genre. I don't even know what i want to animate yet if it's video games or videos. I would love to learn to animate video games. Now here's the question. What should i start learning? and how should i go about it? I need directions and i hoped someone could give me some.
    kanochi likes this.
  2. kanochi

    kanochi Cupcake-About-Town

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    I would apply to a college for that sort of thing but the programs I do know for that sort of thing are, http://www.blender.org/, http://www.autodesk.com/products/autodesk-3ds-max/overview. I did a bit of modeling and animating before but never got very into it lol.

    But no you wouldn't really draw a figure and be able to animate it that would be a different type of animation, you'd more so model something then create bones that connect to the model to move to create animations.

    But yeah unless you apply to a college for modeling and animating and get a degree I don't think they'd really consider you. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/...886.html#s247466&title=University_of_Southern You could try looking into some of those schools though. = P
  3. Sanja Melody

    Sanja Melody Cupcake

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    Thank you i'll look into those programs, and see which one i like the most.

    To sign up for a University like those wouldn't i need to have something to show them?
    I'm from Denmark which is in Europe, though i'm very determined with everything i do so if it is traveling around the world to reach it that isn't a problem. But to get into a school like that wouldn't i have to already know some animating?
  4. Dysp

    Dysp Cupcake-About-Town

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    I won't assume to know much about 3D, but I think the animation is usually done within the modeling software, like Maya or zBrush. Some companies might make their own tools, but I guess it depends on the project. I think fiddling with most any animation software/dev-kit will help build your experience.


    If you want to just move premade models around for sequences there's games like Team Fortress 2 that have robust development kits and is entirely free. You can pose characters, make new animations, or even make full-length videos. There's also DAZ3D, which seems to be posing software with premade models, but I'm not that familiar with it. There's also a step further with Unity, which is more into game development. But I think there are more basic tools in there. The Unreal Tournament game series have also had some pretty solid dev tools for editing and making your own stuff.

    As for actual modeling software, there's Blender which is open source and free, as mentioned above. There are plenty of tutorial videos for Blender. Regardless of making the models or not, I think studying movement and human/animal anatomy would be useful.

    I'd also suggest finding an animation/3D focused forum where you can ask specific questions, post work, and get feedback. I think with most any art/creative profession, degrees aren't necessarily required, they can help, but what matters is what you can actually do. It all depends on you, even a degree won't make you qualified if you're not proactive. Most devs didn't have degrees 10, 15 years ago, because there were no degrees in those fields. Try to learn as much as you can. The more of a self-starter & learner you are, I imagine, the more valuable you will be to a game dev company.

    Aside from online communities, there are plenty of books on 3D.. Whatever works best for you.

    Best of luck! And have fun animating!

    some communities (if youre using specific game's tool, check for modding communities around that)
    http://forums.3dtotal.com/
    http://www.cgsociety.org/
    http://forums.conceptart.org/ (this is more focused on 2D, but is a great resource)

    A list of software:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_3D_animation_software
  5. Avid

    Avid New Cupcake

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    I went to school for Game art and Design (which ended up being mostly 3D stuff). Let me pass on a tidbit of knowledge my teachers passed to me. In the grand scheme of things, the tools you use don't matter. It's all about how well of a grip you have on your area. It's not incredibly hard to pick up a new program. But to animate a perfect walk cycle? That's hard.

    It requires knowledge and insight unrelated to the program itself. So do yourself a favor and start paying real close attention to the way things move. Understand how bones and muscles work. Look up things about making a walk animation and they will tell you all the intricate secondary movements that happen when people walk. We all see them, but we never really think about it. You won't need to know how to draw to be an animator, but you will have to have a very good understanding of movement and action.

    All of that being said... For programs to animate in 3DS Max and Maya are pretty common in the industry. Carbine uses Softimage XSI. All of these programs are pretty expensive. Blender is free; but I've never actually used it so I can't personally speak of it's animation capabilities.

    Also...

    This is actually pretty untrue in the entertainment industry. What is most important is your demo reel/portfolio. If you can show them you're an amazing animator (or whatever it may be) they won't care where you got your education, what your education is in, or if you have one at all. Many game designers have degrees in completely unrelated fields.

    That being said, schooling certainly helps you learn quicker.
  6. SiegaPlays

    SiegaPlays "That" Cupcake

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    I can recommend finding the 2 videos about Carbines prop team. They answer a couple of questions about such. I remember one of the recommendations on a similar question was to check out the polycount community over at http://www.polycount.com/

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